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Achieving Luminosity with Transparent Watercolor
 

Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000190 EndHTML:0000029020 StartFragment:0000001748 EndFragment:0000028984 SourceURL:file:///Users/carolking/Downloads/Video%201%20text%20PARITAL%23343BB3.doc Hi! I'm Jim Kosvanec and I'd like to welcome you to my home and studio in the charming colonial town of San Miguel de Allende, in central Mexico.

 

 

I've painted most of my life, but for over ten years now, the main focus of my art work has been in the medium of watercolor.

 

 

For me, no other painting medium offers such stimulating challenges or is so visually rewarding - when done well.

 

 

It didn't take me long to discover why transparent watercolor is considered so difficult. 

 

 

My first attempts seemed to lack the richness and clarity of color I'd admired in the works of masters - both past and present.

 

 

In short order, I had lots of questions concerning paints and proper color combinations, questions that were unique to transparent watercolors.

 

 

After searching existing books and videos I uncovered very little information, so I began to research the answers to my questions.

 

 

What I gradually envisioned,

 

 

on the, somewhat irrepressible, analytical side of me,

 

 

was a system for predicting clean color combinations that would apply to any color I might choose.

 

 

My book, "Transparent Watercolor Wheel"  grew out of that four years of research, and this series of videos is yet a further evolution.

 

 

I'm looking forward to this highly visual format, because it will allow me to personally explore - with you - my watercolor wheel as well as some of the other factors that affect luminosity.

 

 

This series is entitled "Achieving Luminosity with Transparent Watercolor."  Luminosity is the attribute that distinguishes a well-executed transparent watercolor painting from one using an opaque medium. It’s a term that’s often used, but, perhaps how it relates to transparent watercolors is new for you so let me try to define its use.

 

I find watercolor, especially transparent watercolor, a special painting medium. But, It can also be an uncompromising medium. Washes can go daffy even when you’re convinced that all’s going flawlessly. Of course there’s nearly always an explanation for why things went awry, but that’s not a lot of consolation after you spent hours on your conception, the drawing and then the painting.

 

 

Just improvising, say with large wet washes and a spray bottle of water, can be fun, but if you're serious about wanting to become a better watercolorist, you’ll need to learn the "craft" of painting with watercolors as well. It’s like any skill you may want to learn. For instance, if you wanted to learn how to play  golf,  bridge or even the violin, you’d probably take lessons, read books , study videos  and then practice the necessary skills involved, right?. Then, once you had a handle on the basics and felt competent, you could let loose and in the case of art or music let creativity take its course. And it would, quite naturally without the roadblocks of inadequate skills looming up.

 

 

When I decided to become serious about watercolor as a painter’s medium, I had lots of questions.  I didn't need a "how to book", since I had years of experience using other mediums and knew how to draw and paint since a child.  I was seeking the basic, yet very unique, information needed to approach painting in transparent watercolors. My book "Transparent Watercolor Wheel"  grew out of that need and after four years of research evolved into the book (or books) I couldn't find.

 

 

This series of videos acts as an extension of the book and will allow me to personally explore  various concepts with you in a highly visual format that will be as interactive as a video tape can be. I'm looking forward to the experience!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shortly, we’re going to explore my transparent watercolor wheel and see how you can choose and produce clean, luminous color combinations every time and avoid the mud.

 

 

Here’s what I mean about luminosity and it’s really what makes watercolors so special -- when done correctly. The pigments that make up our colors allow light to pass through them and if the colors are properly applied to the paper, the light passes through the watercolor particles, then through the transparent external sizing layer, reflect off white paper and returns through the external sizing and the watercolor particles, illuminating them like stained glass. Its this stained glass effect that we call luminosity.

 

 

What affects luminosity? Well, there’s a lot more than we can cover in this tape, that’s for certain. But let me give you a list of them and a few thoughts of what to guard against. I’ll discuss most of these subjects in other videos.

 

 

Watercolors can look fine when they’re mixed on a mixing tray or mixed on the paper. They even look great when they’re wet on the paper, and then like a miracle of nature the wash dries as a gem or as unappealing as an oil spill on your garage floor. I’ll give you the solution for successful color mixing in a little while, but first let’s cover what other factors can affect luminosity.

 

 

Brushwork. What I see most often with students is overworking the brush. If one stroke of the brush works, maybe a dozen or two will be better. Doesn’t work that way and nearly everyone knows it, but it’s tough to get out of the habit of overworking the paper. No matter how transparent a combination of colors is that you paint with, if you work that paint down throughout the sizing and into the paper, you’re going to lose some measure of luminosity because the paper that ordinarily reflects white is now soaked with color with no pigments suspended on the surface of the external sizing above it that it can illuminate because the external sizing barrier has been destroyed! The solution -- it’s kinda obvious - make your brushwork economical, use a light touch and be patient.

 

 

Also, the type of brush you use is important. A stiff brush like nearly all synthetics is more likely to scrub and release the external sizing a lot faster than a fine Kolinsky. The solution is to invest in one or two fine brushes and toss your extended family collection of synthetics into a decorative jar.

 

 

The majority of watercolor painters, including many who are advanced, don’t understand how to properly suspend their watercolors with water. More often than not, the wash is a too thin and applied dry or at the other extreme, too pasty and looks dull when dry. Correcting it is simple, create juicy washes and apply them properly. Unfortunately, just saying that isn’t very helpful. What is a juicy wash? And how do I know when it’s properly suspended? Then, how do I load the brush and apply it with confidence?

 

 

The solution is to study and practice water-to-paint ratios and then learn how to apply them to paper. I covered this important subject lightly in the book, but my video on water-to-paint suspension and floating in color will really ignite the bulb for you regarding what the masters referred to as the mysterious “juicy” wash. Generally, a watercolorist learned to create juicy washes through years of practice and even then it wasn’t a given that the painter acquired the understanding of water-to-paint ratios . You can cut that time down to a rained out weekend if you apply the instruction. In fact, you’ll be taking the technique well beyond the basics, into floating in color and how to create extraordinary visual effects.

 

 

What paints you select affect luminosity. You might be using a brand of a color without checking it out. Simply because a label describes a color, doesn’t mean that’s necessarily what’s in the tube. Unfortunately, a discussion of paints is beyond the scope and tape length of this video. There’s some guidance in the book, but one if one recommendation comes to mind above all others, use professional grades of paint and not student grade. Perhaps I’ll have the pleasure of teaching a workshop for you some day and we’ll go through this subject with time on our side.

 

 

Watercolor additives. Watercolor paints are partly composed of but can also be enhanced by the proper use of gum arabic and other related products. I frequently replenish or increase the proportion of gum arabic in my paint wells to produce more lustrous color.

 

 

The paper you select can affect luminosity. The hardness or softness, whiteness, and sizing can play a role in how light reflects back through the paint and illuminates it like stained glass. My solution is to buy a white, modestly hard paper with excellent internal and external sizing like Winsor & Newton’s or Twinrocker’s beautiful handmade paper.

 

 

Despite how discriminating you are with your paper selection, if you use hot water while soaking your paper for stretching or prepare the surface by over scrubbing the external sizing, you’ll lose some of that important “hold-out” - the barrier - the external sizing that partially keeps the paint from absorbing into the paper fibers and compromising the reflectance from a white surface.

 

 

In the same vein, the practice of equivocating with watercolor statements and continually pressing a tissue, paper towel or sponge onto the surface to remove color before it has a chance to dry, will rapidly remove the surface sizing and destroy luminosity by pressing the paint down into the white paper fibers. Remember, to fully illuminate the paint particles, light should bounce back from white paper to create the stained glass effect. External sizing is fairly delicate and needs to be treated with a light yet deliberate touch to survive. Patience is the key. Unless you’re absolutely certain you’ve made a gross miscalculation of color or value in your painting, leave your watercolor washes alone! Nine times out of ten, you’ll find they were correct and even if they’re a little off, the result will be better than having compromised the paper’s integrity. I think it was Frank Reilly who said, “If a wash looks right when it’s wet, it wrong!” I’ll state it another way. Now remember this, if a wet wash looks too dark when it’s wet, it’s probably right when it dries.

 

 

When watercolors are well done, light seems to glow from the paper and the painting takes on more than just the essence of a fine piece of art. There’s a lot more to creating a piece of art than simply paying attention to how you mix colors but if you take this learning process one step at a time, you’ll become a much better painter than you are today, a lot faster than you ever thought possible.

 

 

 

 

I find that there are colors that have characteristics that make them compatible in color mixing or make them create terrifying puddles of mud. Every color falls into one of three major categories.

 

 

Let’s start off with what creates the effect of luminosity. Remember, our watercolors, even the opaques allow light to pass through the pigment. It’s how much light that passes through that determines if it’s an transparent, semi-transparent, semi-opaque or opaque.

 

 

A properly applied transparent watercolor wash allows light to pass through it, onward, through the transparent layer of external sizing and then reflect back from relatively white paper. When the light returns through the color pigments, they illuminate like stain glass does when a light shines through from behind.

 

 

The watercolor wheel has five rings, but for now, we’re just concerning ourselves with the three major rings since the other two are subcategories.

 

 

 

My research taught me that colors have characteristics that make them compatible in mixing or cause them to create terrifying puddles of mud. What you’re going to learn isn’t rocket science. It’s so easy to understand, you’ll wonder why no one before me thought of it.

 

 

Let’s take a look at my color wheel as it appears in the book.

 

 

 

This fold out page is removable and makes a handy reference guide in your studio. 

 

 

 The full wheel has five rings. As with most color wheels, the colors are arranged on these rings in a counterclockwise order, running from yellows at the top through reds at about eight o’clock and then blues, greens and then back up to yellow. This arrangement allows us to make color selections for complements, triads and analogous colors as conveniently as with other wheels, BUT now, we can choose the BEST color combination that suits our purpose, and know that the wash, when it dries, will be RADIANT or in certain cases even dull, if that’s what you want. Two of the rings are sub-categories, so for simplicity’s sake, let’s couple them with there parent ring.

 

 

 If you learn how the three primary rings inter-relate, and understand and abide by the limitations, you can select color combinations with confidence. With just three rings, understanding the guidelines that govern color relationships is very easy.

 

 

We're going to begin by looking at the three primary rings one by one:

 

 

 Let’s take the innermost ring on the wheel, where you’ll find the transparent non-staining colors, and, in order to make this as simple as possible, we'll combine it with the second ring of semi-transparent non-staining colors forming our first primary ring, Transparent and Semi-transparent non staining colors.

 

 

The third ring on the full wheel is where the transparent staining colors reside. This ring will stand alone as our second primary ring, Transparent Staining colors.

 

 

 Now, combining rings four and five from the full wheel we form our third primary ring  where the opaque and semi-opaque colors will reside along with whitened and blackened opaques and semiopaques — all on the same ring.

 

 

Keep in mind, the first primary ring is non-staining and the second primary ring is staining yet both are transparent.

 

 

The first major category is the Transparent and Semi-Transparent Non-staining group. Their pigments are very fine and are compatible with all colors.  The only difference between these two is that the semi-transparent colors are slightly more opaque.

 

 

The second major category is the one to watch out for. These transparent staining colors  have been dubbed the devil colors by students. The pigments are so fine they bear the unfortunate idiosyncrasy of sometimes attacking other colors and staining - then dulling them.
B Grade Products Guide
  What is "B" grade?


This may surprise you! From what we've consistently found, the downgrade is so minor that the issue is virtually undetectable or so insignificant that the product could easily pass as "A" grade.


Here are a few reasons for a downgrade based upon our observations and reports coming back from customers who have ordered pallets of "B" grade products.


   The white point, which must fall into a specific range, is off by a point or two. What this means, is that the brightness is so slightly out of range that companies that sell their products at premium prices cannot guarantee their customers that the brightness is precisely the same as former rolls. To us as printers, this is an opportunity to benefit from the savings. In reality, no end user will ever notice the difference in the white point unless they are running editions!


   There may be pinholes. While this seems to be a scary issue, our experience has been that the pinholes may or may not show up at all. We had one customers report that he never found a pinhole in 70 rolls! That doesn't mean there will be none, but, when premium products are milled, there are very strict standards and finding one or two pinholes in several hundred square feet would set off an alarm as a premium product. Obviously taking a chance on finding a pinhole that can't be curated as opposed to the savings, is a no brainer for the business minded printer.


   Edge skipping. The coating may have skipped (or skidded) near the edge of the canvas or paper. Given, that we ordinarily print with a white border, this usually isn't an issue. Obviously, even if it's a very minor situation, this isn't allowable for a premium product, so it's downgraded. Other than that, the white point would be perfect and there would be no pinholes, so, chances are that it's a windfall for the buyer, although there may be one or two reproductions out of a hundred or so where the skip might be slightly evident, in our opinion, the savings far outweigh the unlikely event of finding a skip.


If you have further questions, feel free to call us!
Differences between Matte, Satin, Semimatte and Glossy Photo Paper
  The light reflective qualities of the final printed image play an important part in the decision of which proofing paper should be purchased for the project. The major manufacturers cover most if not all of the paper choices. In the order of reflective surfaces come matte, satin, semimatte, and glossy.

Matte proofing paper has a flat appearance as it does not reflect light and has little or no contrast qualities. More ink is absorbed by Matte paper than other types and provides an excellent printed image.

Satin proofing paper has some sheen to it and is considered more reflective than Matte but less than that of Semimatte.

Semimatte proofing paper has a higher reflection than Satin but less then Glossy.

Glossy proofing paper has the highest reflective qualities and is excellent for color definition and high contrast photographic printing.

In addition to the glossy surface, or lack thereof, manufacturers also grade their paper offerings according to brightness, whiteness, thickness, weight, and opacity. Each of these conditions are rated or measured according to industry standards.

Within the manufacturer specifications given for each of the Proofing Papers the following standards may be referred to: ISO 2471 (International Organization for Standardization) This standard specifies the method used to determine the opacity of white paper which contains fluorescent whitening agents.

Brightness can be determined by TAPPI 452 (Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry) and ISO 2470. The brightness of white, near white, and naturally colored paper is measured by the method contained in these standards.

GRACol Certified (General Requirements and Applications for Commercial Offset Lithography) IDEAlliance, an organization that has created general guidelines and recommendations for quality color printing across the industry.

SWOP (Specifications for Web Offset Publications) A set of specifications for publication printing that ensures measurable, consistent results at each step in the printing process. SWOP guidelines address quality-of-material issues in pre-press and proofing as well as on-press challenges of color matching, dot gain and different paper stocks

ASTM D523 (ASTM International, formerly the American Society for Testing and Materials) This standard measures the Gloss rating found on paper.

I originally printed with the Premium Luster with my 9600(and a 10000 before that), but switched over to the Premium Semi-Matte as I found that the color gamut, bronzing, etc. was essentially identical between the two papers, but I preferred the lack of surface texture with the Semi-Matte. Less gets in the way of experiencing the image, even when framed under glass. Both papers work exceptionally well with the Atkinson profiles.
Does Canvas and Paper Warehouse Offer a Non-OBA Paper or Canvas?
  Unfortunately, most of the products sold in today's market contain OBA's and it is very difficult to find a product that does not contain some brighteners. Canvas and paper products are traditionally sold with at least minimal amounts, as the color properties would not be able to match those other products on the market without it. We do have one product which is our Eco-solvent canvases, which can be seen HERE.
If you would like more information about our products offerings and the chemical compositions, feel free to call us at 805-747-4611 and we will be happy to help you find the ideal product.
Fine Art Paper
  Delivering the highest quality fine art prints requires the very best digital fine art paper. Canvas & Paper Warehouse carries a great selection of top quality fine art paper for Epson, HP, Canon, and other name brand printing solutions. While many printers exist as the gateway for countless micro-transactions, with name brands charging you a premium to refill your printer with their prescribed canvases and fine art paper. Canvas & Paper Warehouse carries fine art paper for inkjet printers from the same manufactures that the big name brands use, but without the big name markup.

At Canvas & Paper Warehouse, you can find the perfect velvet fine art paper roll for your printing needs. With a 100% cotton printing surface, a quality velvet rag texture is a favorite among photographers because of the high quality, long lasting image it provides for a lavish look and a higher dimensional stability thanks to its image quality and ink load capability. While you can find an outstanding look from Epson velvet cotton rag paper, you don’t have to pay the high Epson premium to get the same quality you can expect from an Epson velvet fine art paper roll.

When it comes time to replace that costly Epson velvet fine art roll, do yourself a favor and instead consult Canvas & Paper Warehouse’s great selection and professional staff. If you have the product number and printing profile, you can easily find the perfect fit when seeking a replacement velvet cotton rag paper roll. If you experience any difficulty finding the right roll, just consult our knowledgeable staff and they’ll help guide you.

Of course, when selecting the right fine art paper for photo, rag textured may not be what you’re looking for. You may find that there are other capabilities you seek when selecting a fine art paper for Epson, HP, Canon, or whichever brand printer you have. For example, bright white smooth matte fine art paper offers you instant drying capabilities as well as excellent color brilliance and image definition. Designed to hold your colors and display them in brilliant high quality images, our selection of bright white smooth matte fine art paper comes in three sizes to fit any fine art printing application you may need.

For those seeking to combine the strengths of our bright white smooth matte and velvet cotton rag texture fine art papers, cold press-textured fine art paper blends textured surfaces to deliver an instant dry with high density and brilliant images. Whatever fine art paper best suits your needs, you’ll find it at Canvas & Paper Warehouse. Best of all, you’ll find it at an unbelievable value!
Owning and Operating Wide Format Printers
  As the owner and operator of a wide format inkjet printer, you know how expensive the materials can be. Whether your wide format inkjet printer is for personal use, for your internal business use, or for a printing service you provide as part of your business, you made the decision to have a wide format printer because you know just how costly the printing process can be. At Canvas & Paper Warehouse, we are able to provide the top quality, professional grade printable canvas for inkjet printers that you can rely on to deliver the right look in your finished product. Best of all, our industry position allows us to offer it at unbelievably competitive prices.

Printing solutions using a printable canvas for inkjet printers open a world of possibilities. A wide format inkjet canvas can bring fine art to photography to glorious life, or help present big ideas for a strong presence in the office. From corporate presentations to family portraits over the mantle, selecting the right canvas for inkjet printing can make all the difference.

Unfortunately for most, the price point of a quality inkjet canvas roll is often prohibitively high. These high prices often mean either settling for low quality product or limiting the number of projects or pieces you can print or have printed, and for some printers it means both. Canvas & Paper Warehouse’s fantastic pricing makes it possible to have both high quality inkjet canvas rolls and the freedom to use that canvas for inkjet printing for all your needs rather than having to pick and choose the pieces you absolutely must print off in a large and high quality format.

Not only does Canvas & Paper Warehouse offer high quality canvas for inkjet printing, but we also offer a wide selection of top manufacturer rolls of canvas for printing. Top of the line wide format inkjet printers are sold as a means of committing you to a long-term relationship that is very profitable to the big name printing companies like Canon, HP, and Epson. Wide format canvas is as much a part of their profit margins as the ink is, but Canvas & Paper Warehouse makes it possible to purchase these same exact materials without paying the big name markup.

When selecting the right canvas for printing, inkjet printer companies suggest specific canvas rolls that have been sold under their name brand. However, these companies are not the manufacturers. Using the product code and printing profile, you can find the same high quality canvas rolls in our inventory. If you have any questions about which canvas roll will match your printing needs, don’t hesitate to call our friendly and professional staff.  







Photo Paper
  Digital photography has opened amazing new frontiers for the professional and even amateur photographer. The ability to see your image immediately, as well as all the ways you can modify and correct an image without the costly and time consuming process of working in a dark room, has revolutionized the world of photography. However, a high quality photo wasn’t designed to live on a social media website. With the right professional photo paper, you can showcase the full potential that digital photography unlocks.

At Canvas & Paper Warehouse, we offer a wide selection of high quality premium photo paper for all your photo paper needs. Satin photo paper helps you print bright colors and sharp details, while providing the benefits you’ve come to expect from professional photo labs. At Canvas & Paper Warehouse, you can find the perfect satin photo paper roll to give your printed images the perfect look and feel. And premium instant dry satin photo paper’s texture is a benefit beyond just the confidence of the familiar feel you’re used to receiving from professional photo labs.

Satin photo paper offers more than just the “right” feel for your digital photo prints. Its light texture resists fingerprints, dirt, and smudges, while its satin surface helps break down glare and reflections so that the image people see when they look at your photo prints is the image you intended. Canvas & Paper Warehouse carries a number of satin paper rolls that the top name brands in printing sell, offering all the quality while delivering great value instead of the name brand markup that makes photo printing so costly.

By dealing directly with the actual manufacturers of top of the line print media, Canvas & Paper Warehouse offers you the same top quality printing materials you’d purchase from name brand providers like Canon, Epson, and HP. Premium instant dry photo paper, available in gloss and satin finishes, can be found to match whatever your printing needs may be. For example, if you are looking for a match for your usual Epson glossy photo paper, all you need is the roll’s product code and printing profile. If you need assistance and don’t have that information you can rely on our knowledgeable staff to help you navigate our extensive inventory of high quality products.

Canvas & Paper Warehouse carries a great selection of materials to match any printing needs. If you’re looking for 10 mil paper or resin-coated papers, you’ll find the same high quality products at far better prices than you can from other print media or RC photo paper suppliers. From RC glossy photo paper, to color papers, to any number of finishes, Canvas & Paper Warehouse carries the right solution for you.
Using Giclee Inkjet Printers for Your Canvas Prints
  Creating artwork is an intimate, time-consuming process. When you’re done you could just sell the art piece and call it a job well done. However, if there is growing demand for your art, you can make prints. You can’t sell prints for as much as the original piece, but the lower price point for a print means you widen your potential market.

Making Giclee Canvas Prints for Sale
Giclee printing is a powerful inkjet process that prints your artwork on paper or canvas. However, don’t think about a regular desktop printer—giclee printers are special high-quality ink printers that are capable of matching the original artwork’s colors.

The printer itself is large, capable of handling big print sizes. However, due to the cost and maintenance required of giclee printers, your best bet is to find a printing service that does giclee.

The First Step for Making Canvas Art Prints for Sale
You will need to find a printer. If you can, work locally. Giclee art prints go best when you can interact directly with the store. There are websites where you can submit a high quality scan and will mail you the resulting image.

Investigate the costs associated with the printers you’re considering. The price will vary depending on the medium you print on and the resulting size. There are other variables in play, too, which can create a difference in pricing.

Canvas Prints for Sale Need a High Quality Scan
A print can only be as good as the digitization of the original. Some printers will have the ability to do a high quality scan—though that will only work if you are working with a local printer. If your printer doesn’t have a high quality scanner or you’re going through an online service, you’ll have to provide the digital file.

Using Paper or Canvas for Printing
Many artists prefer how their images look when reproduced on the same media that the original was done on. However, there is a huge appeal to the higher quality of canvas; getting a canvas print done can allow anything from a charcoal drawing to a photo to really pop when hung on the wall.

Photographers will especially enjoy the way the sharp, accurate colors of the giclee printing process will make their photos look on canvas.

Getting Canvas Prints for Cheap
Giclee printing is not an inexpensive process. There is the cost of scanning, the cost of canvas (even paper can add up), and the actual cost of printing—not to mention the prices of quality frames.

Finding deals and coupons for canvas prints and pictures is one way to try and keep the cost down. There are sometimes deals on Groupon for canvas print services. Remember, also, the whole process involved with getting giclee prints—if you can’t find any deals for the process, you may find a coupon for the framing or the stretcher and bars.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the more prints you order of a piece of art, the cheaper the overall process ends up being. If you can sustain a large order it will be cheaper per piece than if you place a small order.

How Cheap ARE Cheap Canvas Prints for Sale?
Unfortunately, only you can determine what your prices will be. If you want to use canvas for printing, it will need to be stretched over a frame. If you end up using paper, you can use a regular frame. Either way the price will need to be considered.

However, a good rule of thumb is to price high enough to make some profit, but low enough that you can keep a good turnover. But, as with many things in the world of commerce, supply and demand should dictate how you price your prints.

After all, is there any greater joy than people actually wanting a print of your artwork to hang in their kitchen or nursery? It’ll make the stress of finding someone who can do canvas for inkjet giclee printers totally worthwhile.
Wide Format Printing
  As the owner and operator of a wide format inkjet printer, you know how expensive the materials can be. Whether your wide format inkjet printer is for personal use, for your internal business use, or for a printing service you provide as part of your business, you made the decision to have a wide format printer because you know just how costly the printing process can be. At Canvas & Paper Warehouse, we are able to provide the top quality, professional grade printable canvas for inkjet printers that you can rely on to deliver the right look in your finished product. Best of all, our industry position allows us to offer it at unbelievably competitive prices.

Printing solutions using a printable canvas for inkjet printers open a world of possibilities. A wide format inkjet canvas can bring fine art to photography to glorious life, or help present big ideas for a strong presence in the office. From corporate presentations to family portraits over the mantle, selecting the right canvas for inkjet printing can make all the difference.

Unfortunately for most, the price point of a quality inkjet canvas roll is often prohibitively high. These high prices often mean either settling for low quality product or limiting the number of projects or pieces you can print or have printed, and for some printers it means both. Canvas & Paper Warehouse’s fantastic pricing makes it possible to have both high quality inkjet canvas rolls and the freedom to use that canvas for inkjet printing for all your needs rather than having to pick and choose the pieces you absolutely must print off in a large and high quality format.

Not only does Canvas & Paper Warehouse offer high quality canvas for inkjet printing, but we also offer a wide selection of top manufacturer rolls of canvas for printing. Top of the line wide format inkjet printers are sold as a means of committing you to a long-term relationship that is very profitable to the big name printing companies like Canon, HP, and Epson. Wide format canvas is as much a part of their profit margins as the ink is, but Canvas & Paper Warehouse makes it possible to purchase these same exact materials without paying the big name markup.

When selecting the right canvas for printing, inkjet printer companies suggest specific canvas rolls that have been sold under their name brand. However, these companies are not the manufacturers. Using the product code and printing profile, you can find the same high quality canvas rolls in our inventory. If you have any questions about which canvas roll will match your printing needs, don’t hesitate to call our friendly and professional staff.